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Inn at Cape Cod

Archive for the ‘Protecting the environment’ Category

More News Of The Right Whales At Herring Cove, Cape Cod

March 24th, 2012 by Mike Cassels

The Right Whales return to Cape CodFollowing up on our recent blog, we have now been up twice to Provincetown to see the whales for ourselves, equiped with some decent binoculars. Our first attempt was only partially successful due to some less than perfect weather conditions. We did nonetheless see some glimpses of the Right Whales, enough to convince us to make a second trip when the conditions were much better.

It is around an hour’s drive to the northern most tip of Cape Cod from our Inn in Yarmouth Port, and we chose tuesday this week for our second trip. It was a warm sunny day (70 degrees) with only a slight breeze. So this time the water was like a millpond at Herring Cove.We walked a mile or more towards Race Point Lighthouse, all the time mesmerised by multiple sightings of whales about 200 to 300 yards from the shore. We heard the unmistakeable noise that whales make when they surface. There was so much activity it made us breathless with excitement……… tails, breaches, multiple whales. What a magnificent sight! We didn’t know where to look next - they were everywhere!

Although without question, these early spring days are perfect for whale watching from the shore, there is an element of luck involved in just how much you are going to see from one day to the next. However, there is a rich reward awaiting you, if you get that timing right.

All of our weekend guests were focused on seeing the whales, as we helped each couple to plan their day after this morning’s breakfast. We cannot wait to hear how they all got on at breakfast tomorrow.

 

So Many Whales To See, Thanks To The Unsung Heroes Of Cape Cod

March 18th, 2012 by Mike Cassels

Whales have returned to Cape Cod waters much earlier this year and have many marine scientists scratching their heads to come up with an explanation for this. It may very well be a combination of several different factors, including the higher than usual water temperature – it is some 3 to 4 degrees warmer than the average temperature measured over the last fifteen years. A more abundant food supply may also have had some impact.

To Cape Cod residents and visitors alike, there is the opportunity to see a large number of these magnificent creatures without so much as getting your big toe wet! Although catching a glimpse of the odd whale or two from the shore is always a possibility from April through October, early spring is probably one of the best times – there are currently around 40 to 50 Right Whales just off Provincetown. The Right Whale is an endangered species, and there are thought to be only three to four hundred remaining in the world. The best vantage points are likely to be Herring Cove and Race Point, where the views could be spectacular ( if you’re lucky).We are heading up there this week with some friends, and will try to pick a suitable day weather-wise and as calm conditions as we can to ensure the best possible visibility. Watch this space to see how we get on!

As well as the Right Whale, the other species of whales most commonly seen in Cape Cod waters include the Humpback and Minke. There are Sperm Whales in much deeper water further out in the ocean, and very occasionally indeed, a Blue Whale is sighted.

Finally, we should spare a thought for the dedicated people of IFAW, the International Fund for Animal Welfare and their volunteers, who work tirelessly around the world on our behalf to preserve and save animals, often from extinction. Their International HQ is here in our street in Yarmouth Port, and it is fitting that they are on Cape Cod, as they work daily to rescue stranded and injured whales, dolphins, seals and indeed any other animal you can think of. IFAW leads the world in the science of marine mammal stranding, but their efforts are multifaceted. For example, IFAW has worked successfully with the New England fishing industry to redesign the fishing nets in an effort to significantly reduce the number of fatal whale entanglements. Work such as this and IFAW’s many other campaigns need support from the public. If this is all new to you, and you care about animals and the environment on Cape Cod and beyond, please take a look at what this wonderful organisation is doing – we can all help a little so their efforts achieve an even greater impact.

We are once again offering a great whale adventure package this year and for every package sold, we shall donate $25 to IFAW. However, if this does not appeal to you, just come and see the whales for yourself from the National Seashore. Thank you.

International Fund for Animal Welfare’s HQ on Cape Cod

February 10th, 2010 by cassels

In 2006, when we were searching for an inn, we were delighted to learn that the town we had chosen (Yarmouth Port) was also home to the international headquarters for IFAW, a wonderful non-profit organisation that fights worldwide to help rescue, save, and protect all the creatures we share this planet with. We had been supporters of IFAW www.ifaw.org  for many years before we moved to Cape Cod, so to find them almost on our doorstep seemed to good to be true!

Then 2 years ago, IFAW relocated to their new “green” head office just a mile down our same street, so we contacted them and were able to meet some of their dedicated staff. We decided to get a program going so that we could continue to support their efforts in a small way. This is especially relevant here on Cape Cod, where whales can been seen offshore at many points around the peninsula, or on special whale-watching cruises.  We also learned that the co-owner of the Old Yarmouth Inn restaurant:  www.oldyarmouthinn.com,  just next door to us,  was also a long-time supporter and fund-raiser, so how’s that for karma!

IFAW successfully worked with local fishermen to develop nets that wouldn’t harm or trap whales, and are always on call to help any creature in distress, be it a whale or a manatee locally, or some exotic creature much further afield.

IFAW are presently working in Haiti with WSPA and other agencies to help treat, vaccinate and re-home injured livestock and pets affected by the recent tragic earthquake.

To learn more about IFAW’s tireless efforts, check out their website, shown above, or read their blog to get updated reports on Haiti, and other current projects: http://animalrescue.typepad.com/animal_rescue_blog/

And should you wish to stay a while in this wonderful area, you could take a look at our Cape Cod B & B Inn. Don’t hesitate to call or email us if you need any help coosing one of our rooms or suites.

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