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Inn at Cape Cod

Posts Tagged ‘Cape Cod History’

Presidents’ Day at Cape Cod’s “White House”

February 14th, 2011 by cassels

Mount Rushmore As non-Americans living and working in this wonderful country, we feel privileged to be able to share some of its historic traditions, including the celebration of Presidents’ Day next weekend. The connection is even greater because our inn, according to many of our guests, bears a striking resemblance to the White House, a mini and modest version of course . So we decided to learn a little more about this holiday weekend in February,

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Cape Cod’s Rock Harbor : the British are now welcome visitors!

April 4th, 2010 by cassels

Rock Harbor Cape Cod never disappoints us on the wealth of its history, and awesome landscape. We have the privilege of living here and running our Cape Cod bed and breakfast as “guests of the U.S.Government”or “Legal Aliens”, and do not miss any opportunity to enjoy our surroundings. Today we had some business to take care of in Orleans, 20 minutes from our inn by car, and as we had time for lunch we thought we would take advantage of the warm sunny spring weather and take a sandwich to Rock Harbor. We knew just the place – a recent find during this past winter – it is on Main Street and lovingly called Cape Cup.

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Historic Cape Cod names with an “Old England” connection

March 29th, 2010 by cassels

Barnstaple Parish Church Some first-time visitors to Cape Cod are amazed to discover that the peninsula/island is a lot more than just a sand-dune, and that in fact Cape Cod is 65 miles long, has 15 separate towns and an area of almost 400 square miles. Any English visitor here (as we were, at one time) will recognise town names, but will notice, sometimes, a slight change in spelling from the original namesake in the old country. So we’d like to explain how and where some of the town names came from, back in 17th century New England.

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The story of Cape Cod’s Captains’ Mile

March 16th, 2010 by cassels

The section of the Old King’s Highway, which winds its way through the historic village of  Yarmouth Port, has another name dating back decades.Stagecoach

For years locals have referred to this stretch of Route 6A as “Captains’ Mile” due to the large number of historic sea captains houses that line both sides of the road inbetween Willow Street and Union Street. In fact, in 1966 this beautiful district was declared a national historical district. In addition to the 47 sea captains’ homes that are on  the highway, there are a further eight to be found in this charming village, not to mention a number of other historic buildings, including our inn which was the Sears Hotel in the early 19th century.

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Discover the Cape Cod “whale trail” from our Inn

March 3rd, 2010 by cassels

Your adventures during your Cape Cod vacation this season may to some extent be influenced by the advice your innkeeper can give you.  Guests will quite often have preplanned their itinerary with or without this complimentary service, but may need just a gentle nudge in oneDSC_0006 direction or another to decide whether to go whale-watching, spend a day on the beach or perhaps visit Provincetown.  That help in deciding how best to spend the day may, as far as the whale-watching option is concerned, come from listening to the animated accounts from fellow guests who went whale-watching the previous day. This takes place over a leisurely breakfast, served on our terrace overlooking the Inn’s gardens.

Cape Cod is, after all, ranked in the top 10 whale encounter locations in the world. You may even catch sight of one or two from a suitable vantage point on the National Seashore. The Hyannis Whale Watch boat will take you out in comfort to Stellwagen Bank and provide an extremely knowledgeable commentary – yes you do need to take your camera! There is less need, though, for binoculars as some whale sightings will be close to the boat. You may even catch a rare glimpse of a right whale, which is currently one of the most endangered species. You are more likely to see humpback, minke and finback .

The twice-daily 4 hour excursions are ten minutes from our inn, and in our opinion they are the best. Particularly fitting is their sponsorship of IFAW, the International Fund for Animal Welfare, which does so much to preserve the whale population in New England amongst all its other commendable work across the globe. We hope you’ll find an hour to spare for IFAW’s visitor’s centre at the end of Summer Street in their new “green” international headquarters.

So the voyage of discovery continues with a day trip to the tiny island of Nantucket. Maddaket Harbor, Nantucket You will want to go there to see more than the Whaling Museum, but no there can be no more poignant a start to your visit than a look at this fascinating and clever illustration of whaling, which was after all, largely responsible for establishing the thriving settlement of Nantucket in the 17th and 18th centuries. The voyage of the Essex from Nantucket inspired Herman Melville’s story of Moby Dick, and there is often a guided tour of the museum during which you can hear the story of this ill-fated voyage.

If you are now casting your mind back to your whale watching trip, you will doubtless be grateful that whaling is something from the past – at least in this part of the world.

So, if all this appeals to you and you’re planning to spend a few days on the Cape this year, be sure to allow plenty of time to follow the “whale trail”. Why not make your Cape Cod visit even more memorable by staying with us, at our historic Bed and Breakfast Inn? Hope to see you soon!

Yarmouth Port Wharf

July 29th, 2009 by cassels

The old wharf at Yarmouth Port has very little remaining of it’s original structure, and it is believed to have been rebuilt, at least in part, on more than one occasion in the past 300 years.

Now, when standing at the site of the old wharf, it is difficult to imagine that this was the main arterial supply route for the Cape before the arrival of the railroad. Indeed the packet ships and the local merchants’ horse drawn wagons would have made for a very bustling scene in the 17th and early 18th centuries, a very stark contrast to today’s tranquil beauty. The waterways have long since silted up, producing a lush green landscape to contrast with the blue waters that now gently lap against the shore. On a sunny day in spring or fall, a vivid blue sky completes this canvas of natural unspoilt beauty. There is, needless to say, an abundance of wildlife on view.

Helen and I are indeed fortunate to have this wonderful setting a mere ten minutes walk from our inn on Summer Street. Our guests can also enjoy a 2 mile walk, which takes them on from the wharf across the narrow bridge onto Keveney Lane, looking across to wonderful views of Cape Cod Bay. Making their way back along the historic Kings Highway to complete the circuit, our visitors often stop at Hallets for a much needed homemade ice cream or frappe……..Yummy!!

Once refreshed, one can round off this envigourating jaunt with a visit to the former house of Captain Bangs Hallet-name ring a bell? – on the village green, just past the Post Office which deserves a quick visit, in the historic context of this walk. Immediately on entering the Post Office, above the P.O.Boxes, there is a wonderful painting depicting Yarmouth Port in the 1800′s, with our inn, The Inn at Cape Cod, in the foreground.

Cape Cod History

December 15th, 2008 by cassels

Cape Cod, or simply “The Cape” as it is known to most New Englanders, is a small peninsula jutting out into the Atlantic Ocean. It is the Easternmost portion of Massachusetts. Cape Cod’s small town charm and beautiful beaches make it a destination location, especially during summer months.

But how much more do you know about Cape Cod? We thought we would give you a little background information on the alluring Cape Cod area!

 

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