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Inn at Cape Cod

Posts Tagged ‘national seashore’

September On Cape Cod – There is no better time to visit for nature’s therapy

September 15th, 2012 by Mike Cassels

coney island bird manThe Great Outdoors has never been more enticing here on beautiful Cape Cod. For the next six weeks, you will no longer have to stand in line for your favorite ice cream nor find the beach car park full at 9.30 am. The kids are back to school and Route 28 is once again moving freely.

During all those years Helen and I spent living and working in London, we would get out of town as often as we could, to a country house hotel somewhere in the beautiful English countryside, where we could unwind a bit from the stress of our city life-style.  New Yorkers and Bostonians alike can so easily come to Cape Cod and the Islands for similar get-aways to de-tox and get their worries into perspective: if you like, a sort of therapy courtesy of Mother Nature. The English and Cape Cod landscapes are so similar – there is something quite soothing almost therapeutic, about them both. The Cape however, has that added dimension to it when you visit The National Seashore.  You need only stand on the cliff top at Marconi Beach for a few minutes to be mesmerised by it’s huge horizon.

Come and visit the Cape this Fall. Our location is second to none: the tranquility, beauty and historic environment of Cape Cod Bay takes some beating and yet our luxury bed and breakfast inn is so close to everything, and centrally placed to effortlessly explore the best this stunning area has to offer. In the hope you might choose to stay with us please visit the area pages on our website………..you’ll need no further convincing!

 

So Many Whales To See, Thanks To The Unsung Heroes Of Cape Cod

March 18th, 2012 by Mike Cassels

Whales have returned to Cape Cod waters much earlier this year and have many marine scientists scratching their heads to come up with an explanation for this. It may very well be a combination of several different factors, including the higher than usual water temperature – it is some 3 to 4 degrees warmer than the average temperature measured over the last fifteen years. A more abundant food supply may also have had some impact.

To Cape Cod residents and visitors alike, there is the opportunity to see a large number of these magnificent creatures without so much as getting your big toe wet! Although catching a glimpse of the odd whale or two from the shore is always a possibility from April through October, early spring is probably one of the best times – there are currently around 40 to 50 Right Whales just off Provincetown. The Right Whale is an endangered species, and there are thought to be only three to four hundred remaining in the world. The best vantage points are likely to be Herring Cove and Race Point, where the views could be spectacular ( if you’re lucky).We are heading up there this week with some friends, and will try to pick a suitable day weather-wise and as calm conditions as we can to ensure the best possible visibility. Watch this space to see how we get on!

As well as the Right Whale, the other species of whales most commonly seen in Cape Cod waters include the Humpback and Minke. There are Sperm Whales in much deeper water further out in the ocean, and very occasionally indeed, a Blue Whale is sighted.

Finally, we should spare a thought for the dedicated people of IFAW, the International Fund for Animal Welfare and their volunteers, who work tirelessly around the world on our behalf to preserve and save animals, often from extinction. Their International HQ is here in our street in Yarmouth Port, and it is fitting that they are on Cape Cod, as they work daily to rescue stranded and injured whales, dolphins, seals and indeed any other animal you can think of. IFAW leads the world in the science of marine mammal stranding, but their efforts are multifaceted. For example, IFAW has worked successfully with the New England fishing industry to redesign the fishing nets in an effort to significantly reduce the number of fatal whale entanglements. Work such as this and IFAW’s many other campaigns need support from the public. If this is all new to you, and you care about animals and the environment on Cape Cod and beyond, please take a look at what this wonderful organisation is doing – we can all help a little so their efforts achieve an even greater impact.

We are once again offering a great whale adventure package this year and for every package sold, we shall donate $25 to IFAW. However, if this does not appeal to you, just come and see the whales for yourself from the National Seashore. Thank you.

A birds eye view of Cape Cod and the Islands

March 5th, 2010 by cassels

Why not take a plane ride to Nantucket this spring, summer or fall, and if you choose a clear day your 15 minute flight will treat you to magnificent views up the arm of the Cape as far as Provincetown, the National Seashore and Chatham, and of the Islands themselves. If you are really smart, you will time your return to see a magical sunset – what a way to finish a wonderful day on Nantucket.

We have done this several times ourselves, and can vouch for its advantages over taking the boat, but that’s not to say the fast ferry is not a pleasurable experience too. Island Air will take excellent care of you, as indeed they have of us in the past. The flight itself  is exhilerating, in a nine seater aircraft, with the added bonus of the precious time you will save not only in the journey but also at the check in desk , where you can arrive as late as 10 minutes prior to departure. The total time saving on the round trip can be as much as 2 hours.Old North Wharf  Flights leave from Hyannis ( Barnstaple Municiple Airport ),which is only eight minutes from our inn, and there is plenty of reasonably priced parking.

There are a number of sightseeing airplane rides available on Cape Cod, should you not wish to take advantage of the Nantucket option, which is hard to beat. Fly Wilma Sightseeing Tours offers bespoke as well as standard flights out of Provincetown – you can ask to see whatever you like, well up to a point that is, and Captain Hal will take you up in Wilma, which was built in 1927 and may just be the oldest commercially operating aircraft in the U.S.A. So you can go off to see lighthouses, dunes, The National Seashore etc. etc. and maybe if you’re very lucky, the odd whale here and there.

You might want to take a look at Cape Cod under a more environmentally friendly Cape Cod Soaring Adventures at Marston Mills Airport. Here, weather permitting, Randy Charlton will take you up in his glider cruising at a cool 40 mph at 5,000 ft. This must be a wonderful experience given the absence of motor noise. Chatham can offer 25 to 55 minutes in a four seater Cessna, and much like the previously mentioned options, will require reservations a day or so in advance during the season.

With all this talk of aviation, what more fitting place could there be at the end of all this excitement than our very own “Tally Ho” room (maybe that aviators expression is just a British thing ) back at your Bed and Breakfast Inn. Plenty of time to freshen up for an evening on the town : The Brazilian Grill, an authentic rodizio, might fit the bill if you are looking for something lively, or maybe you will choose to leave the car at home after all that motion, and cross the lawn to our wonderful neighbours for dinner. One thing’s for sure – you will certainly sleep well tonight!

Discover the Cape Cod “whale trail” from our Inn

March 3rd, 2010 by cassels

Your adventures during your Cape Cod vacation this season may to some extent be influenced by the advice your innkeeper can give you.  Guests will quite often have preplanned their itinerary with or without this complimentary service, but may need just a gentle nudge in oneDSC_0006 direction or another to decide whether to go whale-watching, spend a day on the beach or perhaps visit Provincetown.  That help in deciding how best to spend the day may, as far as the whale-watching option is concerned, come from listening to the animated accounts from fellow guests who went whale-watching the previous day. This takes place over a leisurely breakfast, served on our terrace overlooking the Inn’s gardens.

Cape Cod is, after all, ranked in the top 10 whale encounter locations in the world. You may even catch sight of one or two from a suitable vantage point on the National Seashore. The Hyannis Whale Watch boat will take you out in comfort to Stellwagen Bank and provide an extremely knowledgeable commentary – yes you do need to take your camera! There is less need, though, for binoculars as some whale sightings will be close to the boat. You may even catch a rare glimpse of a right whale, which is currently one of the most endangered species. You are more likely to see humpback, minke and finback .

The twice-daily 4 hour excursions are ten minutes from our inn, and in our opinion they are the best. Particularly fitting is their sponsorship of IFAW, the International Fund for Animal Welfare, which does so much to preserve the whale population in New England amongst all its other commendable work across the globe. We hope you’ll find an hour to spare for IFAW’s visitor’s centre at the end of Summer Street in their new “green” international headquarters.

So the voyage of discovery continues with a day trip to the tiny island of Nantucket. Maddaket Harbor, Nantucket You will want to go there to see more than the Whaling Museum, but no there can be no more poignant a start to your visit than a look at this fascinating and clever illustration of whaling, which was after all, largely responsible for establishing the thriving settlement of Nantucket in the 17th and 18th centuries. The voyage of the Essex from Nantucket inspired Herman Melville’s story of Moby Dick, and there is often a guided tour of the museum during which you can hear the story of this ill-fated voyage.

If you are now casting your mind back to your whale watching trip, you will doubtless be grateful that whaling is something from the past – at least in this part of the world.

So, if all this appeals to you and you’re planning to spend a few days on the Cape this year, be sure to allow plenty of time to follow the “whale trail”. Why not make your Cape Cod visit even more memorable by staying with us, at our historic Bed and Breakfast Inn? Hope to see you soon!

Your Cape Cod base to see Southern New England

February 28th, 2010 by cassels

One of the most frequent comments from our short-stay guests here at The Inn is that they wished they hadn’t underestimated what there is to see and do in Cape Cod and the surrounding areas. They would love to have had longer than their (average) 3 nights, which only gave them 2 full days to explore.DSC_0274

Sometimes, however, we do have guests return the following season, after a brief taste on their first visit of what the Cape and Islands have to offer. It isn’t so simple, of course, for so many of our overseas visitors, who are planning a two week tour of New England, and have to decide on, and sometimes limit, the places they want to see. The nature of these tours means they are often “living out of a suitcase” for much of the time, which most people don’t really care for. So please think about this, those of you who are in the process of putting together a New England itinerary: perhaps you should consider making Cape Cod your base. It is not just a wonderful destination in its own right, but also a very convenient springboard for comfortable day trips to Newport, Boston, Plymouth & Providence.

You can very easily spend 5 or more days here, assuming you just visit the National Seashore, Provincetown, Chatham, both islands (allowing a day for each of these), then don’t forget, of course, to somehow squeeze in an unforgettable whale-watching excursion. Then factor in a trip to see the Newport Mansions, taking in the scenic cliff-walk, add a couple more of the aforementioned destinations, allow some time to relax locally on one of the gorgeous sandy beaches we are within walking distance of, or drive just a few minutes to choose between many more. So you can now see that a couple of days on Cape Cod is just not realistic, that is if you really want to make the most of your trip.

Tired of driving? Then leave your car in our private parking area for a couple of days and explore the botanical trails that our inn overlooks. Or visit the 2 museums on Yarmouth Port village green: The Edward Gorey House & Captain Bangs Hallets House & Museum, or simply gaze into a magnificent sunset from the romantic Gray’s Boardwalk. Fancy a dip? Stroll down to Dennis Pond, just 5 minutes walk from the inn, and cool off in this  freshwater lake, then sip a glass of wine sitting relaxing on the beach.DSC_0352

We are always delighted to help guests plan their stay with us, either prior to arrival, or each morning during our scrummy breakfast. Start your Cape Cod adventure right here – you won’t want to ever leave!

Marconi Beach – a part of Cape Cod’s rich history

February 10th, 2010 by cassels

“Awe-inspiring” is the term we use to describe the magnificent Marconi Beach, which is part of the Cape Cod National Seashore, and is located on the Atlantic coast of Cape Cod’s “arm”. From the lookout just above the beach there are wonderful, broad sweeping views of Cape Cod Bay and the Atlantic Ocean.

The beach itself is named after the Italian inventor and nobel prize winner Guglielmo Marconi, who in 1903 successfully transmitted the first transatlantic wireless message originating in the U.S. between President Theodore Roosevelt and King Edward VII in the U.K.  But with technology rapidly advancing, the wireless station became outdated within a few years, and was replaced by a more modern one in Chatham, MA.

The barren aspects of this elevated location attracted first Marconi, followed by the government during World War II, where they established Camp Wellfleet as an artillery training facility. When this was no longer needed, the property was transferred to the National Park Service to become part of the Cape Cod National Seashore.

Perhaps the most dramatic piece of  Marconi Beach’s history is the ship-wreck of the pirate vessel the Whydah in 1717 during one of the worst storms in Cape Cod’s history. The vessel was the flagship of Samuel ” Black Sam ” Bellaby, who was on his way back to see his sweetheart Maria Hallet in Provincetown, to finally retire after years of plundering across the seas. He had been away for 2 years and tragically fell short of his destination by 5 miles, just 500 yards from shore. There were 140 pirates aboard with tons of gold and other treasure. In 1984 the underwater explorer Barry Clifford discovered the wreck 10 feet deep in sand on the ocean floor, together with $400 million worth of gold coins and many priceless historical artefacts. www.capecodtravelguide.com/articles/2  & http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=Sp8fAAAAIBAJ&sjid=HNYEAAAAIBAJ&pg=3987,588464&dq=marconi+beach+history&hl=en

Marconi Beach has in more recent times, been ranked as one of the top ten beaches in northeast America, and the many thousands of tourists who visit the beach every will certainly see why.                                                                             

Useful lnks: Marconi Beach www.nps.gov/caco/planyourvisit/marconi-beach.htm    

Cape Cod National Seashore: www.nps.gov/CACO/  

Gugliemo Marconi: http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1909/marconi-bio.html

Cape Cod Chamber of Commerce: www.capecodchamber.org

Cape Cod Times: www.capecodtimes.com

Wellfleet Historical Society: www.wellfleethistoricalsociety.com

Of course, all the beauty of Cape Cod’s national Seashore is within very easy reach of our Cape Cod B & B Inn, where you can stay in one of our 9 gorgeous rooms or suites. We hope to see you soon!

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